Home

About Us

Hall of Heroes

Battlefield Commission

Heritage Genealogical Society

Colonial Commission

Projects

Events

Sesquicentennial

History Center

News Room

News Advocate

Community Links

Interesting Links

Suggested Reading

Gift Shop

Google Grant

Heritage Tourism

Memorial

Salute

 

 

 

 

 

                               

 

 

 

 

The Infamous Kinston Hangings 

Location of Hangings 

The infamous Kinston Hangings took place over 140 years ago. The exact location of the hangings remains a mystery, however enough clues were giving in the records that the general  location has been determined to have  been in a field somewhere behind the Lenoir County Courthouse.

Sign Interpretation

.In the spring of 2003 HPG got the permission from the City of Kinston to erect a sign in the 100 block of South McLlewean St between East Caswell Street and East King Street.  The sign gives a brief interpretation of the hangings.  The interpretation was written by noted Civil War author, Gerard Patterson.  The art work on the sign was commission by America Civil War magazine to illustrate a story written by Gerard Patterson.  The artist is Bob Graham.  Both Mr. Graham and the America Civil War Magazine gave permission for the use of the painting.

 

.

The Day the Kinston Hanging Sign Was Erected 

It was a hot spring day when volunteers gathered on the east side of McLlewean Street behind the Lenoir County Courthouse.  Excitement was in the sir.  The day had arrived when HPG was going to put up the first sign of a series of planned signs relating historical events that had occurred in Lenoir County.  Dr. Lonnie Blizzard pulled up with his flatbed trailer that carried the sign.  Dr. Charles Herring began the measuring and marking off the site for the sign.  Clint Smith and Dennis Heath manned the powered hole digger as it dug to the depth needed to hold the sign erect.  The volunteers went to the flatbed trailer and unloaded the sign.  The wrapping was pulled from the sign and the volunteers got their first viewing of the Kinston Hanging sign.  All present were impressed.  The group raised the sign and slid it into the holes.  Lyle Holland poured the cement that would hold the sign in place.  The volunteers all stepped back and looked at the sign with pride for they knew that this was one more step in the direction of telling the story of Lenoir County’s rich history and they were helping to make it happen.  Volunteers present were Dr. Lonnie Blizzard, Jan Barwick, Cindy Brochure, Pat Humphreys, Dennis Heath, Dr. Charles Herring, Byrd Humphreys, Lyle Holland, Tony Kelly, Jane Phillips, Clint Smith, Leslie Tilghman and Jennifer Wisener

To learn more about the Kinston Hangings CLICK BELOW

       

KINSTON HANGINGS
Author: J. Kenneth Davis

22 Men Hanged in Kinston-Civil War

Pension Records
 

War Crime or Justice?

 

 

 

The Infamous Kinston Hangings 

Location of Hangings 

The infamous Kinston Hangings took place over 140 years ago. The exact location of the hangings remains a mystery, however enough clues were giving in the records that the general  location has been determined to have  been in a field somewhere behind the Lenoir County Courthouse.

Sign Interpretation

.In the spring of 2003 HPG got the permission from the City of Kinston to erect a sign in the 100 block of South McLlewean St between East Caswell Street and East King Street.  The sign gives a brief interpretation of the hangings.  The interpretation was written by noted Civil War author, Gerard Patterson.  The art work on the sign was commission by America Civil War magazine to illustrate a story written by Gerard Patterson.  The artist is Bob Graham.  Both Mr. Graham and the America Civil War Magazine gave permission for the use of the painting.

 

.

The Day the Kinston Hanging Sign Was Erected 

It was a hot spring day when volunteers gathered on the east side of McLlewean Street behind the Lenoir County Courthouse.  Excitement was in the sir.  The day had arrived when HPG was going to put up the first sign of a series of planned signs relating historical events that had occurred in Lenoir County.  Dr. Lonnie Blizzard pulled up with his flatbed trailer that carried the sign.  Dr. Charles Herring began the measuring and marking off the site for the sign.  Clint Smith and Dennis Heath manned the powered hole digger as it dug to the depth needed to hold the sign erect.  The volunteers went to the flatbed trailer and unloaded the sign.  The wrapping was pulled from the sign and the volunteers got their first viewing of the Kinston Hanging sign.  All present were impressed.  The group raised the sign and slid it into the holes.  Lyle Holland poured the cement that would hold the sign in place.  The volunteers all stepped back and looked at the sign with pride for they knew that this was one more step in the direction of telling the story of Lenoir County’s rich history and they were helping to make it happen.  Volunteers present were Dr. Lonnie Blizzard, Jan Barwick, Cindy Brochure, Pat Humphreys, Dennis Heath, Dr. Charles Herring, Byrd Humphreys, Lyle Holland, Tony Kelly, Jane Phillips, Clint Smith, Leslie Tilghman and Jennifer Wisener

To learn more about the Kinston Hangings CLICK BELOW

       

KINSTON HANGINGS
Author: J. Kenneth Davis

22 Men Hanged in Kinston-Civil War

Pension Records
 

War Crime or Justice?