Home
HPG

About Us

Hall of Heroes

Battlefield Commission

Heritage Genealogical Society

Colonial Commission

Kinston Civil War
Round Table

Projects

History Center

News Advocate

 

Lenoir County Civil War Trail Markers

he Lenoir County Civil War Trail  markers are a significant asset to interpreting the history of the battles and developing the battlefield areas.  The Lenoir County Civil War Trails is another step in bringing tourism to Lenoir County. The newest markers has been made possible by a donation from the "CSS Ram Neuse Camp #1427, Sons of Confederate Veterans. T

 


Gary Hines, , Bob Moore and  Linwood Sutton

 

 

 

 

John Taylor Wood
and the
 USS Underwriter

Sponsored by the Kinston Board of Realtors

 

 

 


 

Gen. Bragg and Gen. Hoke's Headquarter
Sponsored by Lenoir Co. Battlefield Commission

This marker concerns the Confederate Battlefield Headquarters at the Howard Family home (the Howard House was demolished in 1960) on the Wyse Fork battlefield.  From that location the Confederate troops were commanded by Gen. Braxton Bragg with the divisions of Major General D. H. Hill and Major General Robert Hoke.  The house was used to plan the battle that resulted in what was the last major Confederate tactical victory of the war.  This resulted in the capture of 900 Union soldiers on the first day of the battle.  Their intent was to stop Gen. Schofield’s Federal Troops from joining up with Gen. Sherman’s forces coming up from South Carolina.  

After the third day of the battle the Confederate forces retreated into Kinston and went on to fight another day.  Gen. Schofield’s Army marched on to join up with Gen. Sherman’s forces.  They all met again at Bentonville. 

You’ll learn even more if you will drive out to view the marker.  The headquarters sign is located at the NE corner of Highway 70 South and Neuse Road.  Drive to the end of the building to read sign.  

The Lenoir County Civil War Trail is the work of the Lenoir County Battlefields Commission.  The markers are a significant asset to interpreting the history of the battles and developing the battlefield areas.  The Civil War Trails is another step in bringing tourism to Lenoir County. The newest marker has been made possible by another donation from the "CSS Ram Neuse Camp #1427, Sons of Confederate Veterans.

 

 



Gary Hines, Dr.Charles Herring and Lyle Holland

North Carolina Junior Reserves
Courageous Young Soldiers
Sponsored by CSS Ram Neuse SCV Camp

If you think you already know all about the Civil War history in Lenoir County, you just might learn something new if you visit the Lenoir County Civil War Trails sign erected recently. 

 The interpretive markers give interesting facts and stories of what happened in battle near the site where the sign is located. The markers are a significant asset to interpreting the history of the battles and developing the battlefield areas.   The newest marker has been made possible by a donation from the "CSS Ram Neuse Camp #1427, Sons of Confederate Veterans".   

The sign relates how the North Carolina Junior Reserves played a part in the Battle at Wyse Fork.  The Junior Reserves were men still in their teens and many had never experienced the horrors of war.   They defended the center and left line along Southwest Creek.  

After graduating from University of North Carolina Walter Clark, a young man, of 17 was made a Major in the 70th Regiment’s Junior Reserves.  His first taste of battle was at Wyse Fork.   Walter Clark survived the battle and lived to become Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court.  He also married into the distinguished and illustrious Washington Family of Lenoir County. 

Another Junior Reservist at the Battle of Wyse Fork was a young man by the name of Jesse Grainger. By the 1880’s Grainger had grown into a successful business man who introduced tobacco farming to Lenoir County and built a warehouse where farmers could sell their crop.  His efforts revolutionized farming and made tobacco the biggest money crop for the next hundred years in Lenoir County. 

Turn left on Neuse Road and go about 1 mile.  The marker is located on the right under the Camp Southwest Sign.